Friday, September 30, 2011

Minnesota Apple Pie


I made an apple pie, today, using a blend of good old Minnesota apples...half were Honey Crisp and half were Harrelsons.   Usually my pie apples are strictly Honey Crisps but I had both varieties so decided to see if they would complement each other.  Good decision!

Wow, is it ever good!  I must confess that I did use a ready made pie crust - Pillsbury makes a great refrigerated crust (2 crusts) that you just unroll one of the crusts onto the pie plate, fill it up and place the second crust on top, cut little vents and pinch the edges closed. Easy as pie!

But if you insist on making your own pie crust, try the recipe for Flaky Pie Crust that I've written for this Squidoo article.  It's excellent.

I used my old faithful apple pie filling recipe from my old faithful Betty Crocker cookbook that I've had forever.

Making apple pie from fresh apples isn't difficult. The hardest part is peeling the apples and when you really only need five or six you can't exactly complain. Here's the recipe for the filling. It's for a 9-inch pie.

Whichever pie crust you choose, here's a great tip for keeping the bottom crust from getting soggy:  Beat an egg white until frothy and brush it onto the bottom crust before you add the fruit filling.  I also prick the bottom crust with the tines of a fork before brushing it with the egg white.  Reserve the rest of the egg white for brushing on the top crust before baking.

First you need pastry for a 9-inch, 2 crust pie. (Either Pillsbury or your homemade...see above)

Then, combine:
3/4 cup sugar (I used raw sugar)
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
Dash of Kosher salt
6 cups thinly sliced pared tart apples
2 or 3 tablespoons cold butter

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.

Stir together the sugar, flour, nutmeg, cinnamon and salt; mix with the apples. Turn the filling into the bottom  pie crust, dot with the butter and cover with the top crust. Cut some slits into the crust.  Seal the edge and either flute with your fingers or with the tines of a fork.

Brush the top crust with the reserved egg white and sprinkle lightly with sugar.  Raw sugar is my sugar of choice for this.

Cover the edge with a strip of aluminum foil or pie crust shields to prevent over browning. You can remove the foil the last 15 minutes or so before the pie is finished.



Bake 40 to 50 minutes or until the crust is brown and the juices begin to bubble through the slits in the crust.






I usually check it at about 30 minutes just to see how it's doing. If I've forgotten to put the foil on the crust edges, I will do it then. But that's really asking for burnt fingers - ha!

Cool on a wire rack. Delicious served either slightly warm with vanilla ice cream.  It's just as good after it has completely cooled...your call.

3 comments:

  1. Cheryl, I thought of you yesterday when I was making an apple pie from my own apple tree. I used a Joy of Cooking recipe, but wondered what you would do and here you are today with a recipe! It's similar to the one I used, but I have enough apples left to make another and will do so with your recipe here. I loved your rhubarb recipe earlier this summer. And the egg white trick is great ! Thank you! So good to see you again!:)

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  2. i forgot to put the butter in....what is the purpose of the butter?

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  3. The butter really enhances the flavor and brings out the spices but it's not critical. I hope you enjoyed the pie!

    I checked out your blog, as well, and tried to leave a comment but couldn't.

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